Recent Series of Rock Slides in Yosemite Prove to be Fatal

0
210
In this Wednesday Sept. 27, 2017, photo provided the National Park Service, a cloud of dust is seen on El Capitan after a major rock fall in Yosemite National Park, Calif. An official says the man killed when a massive hunk of rock fell of Yosemite National Park's El Capitan monolith was a British climber. Yosemite park ranger and spokesman Scott Gediman said Thursday that the man was with a British woman who was seriously injured. (Tom Evans/National Park Service via AP)
Related eBooks

A series of rockfalls at Yosemite National Park that occurred within 24 hours left one person dead and two people injured.

A landslide on El Capitan on Thursday afternoon injured one person, a day after a landslide killed a British tourist and seriously injured another, according to a park statement.

The man killed has been identified as Andrew Foster of Wales. He was 32. His wife, whose name has not been released, remains in hospital.

Thursday’s victim suffered from a fractured skull and was airlifted to a hospital, according to KSEE24 News.

On Wednesday, Foster and his wife were standing at the base of the giant monolith when a 130-ft sheet of rock toppled 1,800 feet to the valley floor, the park said.

DAKOTA SNIDER/AP

It was one of seven rockfalls that happened within a four-hour time span.

While Foster was killed in the slide, according to park officials, his wife was rescued and immediately airlifted to a hospital.

WARNING VIDEO BELOW OF THURSDAY’S LANDSLIDE CONTAINS EXPLICIT LANGUAGE

Peter Zabrok, 58, told NBC News that he was making his 58th climb on El Capitan on Wednesday when he saw a chunk of rock fall from about 1,000 feet.

“I’ve never seen anything like that,” he said, adding that he had spent six nights “directly under the rockfall” before it fell.

Zabrok was also there on Thursday and captured video from the top of El Capitan as yet another much larger landslide occurred.

JOHN P. DEGRAZIO/YEXPLORE YOSEMITE ADVENTURES/AP
DAKOTA SNIDER/AP

The park experiences about 80 rockfalls a year, with many going unreported. The Los Angeles Times reports the last landslide-related death took place in 2013, when a 28-year-old man died after he attempted to climb El Capitan.

A total of 16 deaths and more than 100 injuries from rockfalls have been recorded since the park began keeping records in 1857, according to the park.

SOURCE

 

Comments

comments

NO COMMENTS