Things to Know About the New State Marijuana Laws

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It’s safe to say there was at least one candidate almost everyone could agree on this election: Legal weed.

Eight out of the nine states that could vote for legalizing recreational or medical marijuana did vote in favor. Joining the recreational cannabis club (which already consisted of Washington, Oregon, Colorado, Alaska and Washington DC) are California, Massachusetts, Maine and Nevada.

The Arizona Marijuana Legalization Initiative was the only Act that failed to pass, with 52 percent against and 48 percent in favor.

The medical field expanded with Florida (with a whopping 71 percent of voters in favor), Arkansas, Montana, who voted to remove previously-placed restrictions on their already legal medical marijuana, and North Dakota.

According to a recent Gallup poll, 60 percent of the nation supports legalization of marijuana, and the fact that California just voted in favor of the law says a lot for the rest of the country since the state tends to set political trends. SO, seeing as there are more of us in the great U.S. of A. that can smoke the herb as we damn well please, it’s best to know exactly what to expect in the states that just voted to light up. That way we’ll know what you’re getting into if you live in or are planning to travel to these states, as well as what you could possibly expect if your state picks up the law. Here are the new rules. We’ll start with the recreational side of things. In California, The Adult Use of Marijuana Act allows those 21 and up to possess up to one ounce of cannabis and eight grams of concentrates (any product procured through an extraction process). They are allowed to use it in private homes and businesses licensed for consumption and they can grow up to six plants in a fully enclosed and secure area. Side note: There is a lot of red tape right now in opening a recreational dispensary, and the state has until January 1st, 2018 to issue licenses to those shops. If you know someone who is currently growing pot in their backyard, they can give you some, but money cannot exchange hands as it is still illegal to buy it on the black market. Hang in there, it’ll get simpler.

According to a recent Gallup poll, 60 percent of the nation supports legalization of marijuana, and the fact that California just voted in favor of the law says a lot for the rest of the country since the state tends to set political trends. SO, seeing as there are more of us in the great U.S. of A. that can smoke the herb as we damn well please, it’s best to know exactly what to expect in the states that just voted to light up. That way we’ll know what you’re getting into if you live in or are planning to travel to these states, as well as what you could possibly expect if your state picks up the law. Here are the new rules.

We’ll start with the recreational side of things. In California, The Adult Use of Marijuana Act allows those 21 and up to possess up to one ounce of cannabis and eight grams of concentrates (any product procured through an extraction process). They are allowed to use it in private homes and businesses licensed for consumption and they can grow up to six plants in a fully enclosed and secure area.

Side note: There is a lot of red tape right now in opening a recreational dispensary, and the state has until January 1st, 2018 to issue licenses to those shops. If you know someone who is currently growing pot in their backyard, they can give you some, but money cannot exchange hands as it is still illegal to buy it on the black market. Hang in there, it’ll get simpler.

The Massachussetts Marijuana Legalization Initiative says that people 21 and up can possess up to an ounce in public and 10 ounces in their homes. They can also grow up to six plants and give someone else of legal age up to an ounce.

The Maine Marijuana Legalization Measure gives those 21 and up the right to possess and transport up to 2.5 ounces and up to six plants, as well as cultivate up to six flowering plants, 12 immature plants and however many seedlings they want in their residence.

The Nevada Marijuana Legalization Initiative allows those 21 and older to have up to an ounce of marijuana or an eighth of concentrate and grow up to six plants in an enclosed and locked area for their own use.

Now on to the medically-legal states, which are a little more uniform in what they allow.
The Florida Medical Marijuana Legalization, Arkansas Medical Marijuana Amendment, and North Dakota Medical Marijuana Legalization Initiative all allow therapeutic use for certain disorders such as cancer, epilepsy, glaucoma, HIV, AIDS, post-traumatic stress disorder, and more.

The Montana Medical Marijuana Initiative repealed the three-patient limit on dispensaries, the automatic state review of doctors and the right to inspect unannounced.

But wait, there’s more! Amendments for other states are already in the works for upcoming elections, including Ohio in 2017 and the Oklahoma Medical Marijuana Legalization Initiative, the
Wyoming Medical Marijuana Initiative and the recreational Mississippi Cannabis Freedom Act in 2018.

Who knows what will happen when these hit the polls, but based on the rest of the country I’d say there’s a good chance they’ll get the green light.

Details via Prohbtd

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